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Original Article
Egyptian Journal of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology
Vol. 4 (2014), Issue 1-2, pp. 49-60
doi:10.11131/2014/101347

Role of Aminoguanidine and Nicorandil in Oxidative Stress in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetes Mellitus in Rats

Mahmoud H. Abdel-Rahim1, Faten M. Omran2, Nagwa S. Ahmed3, and Walaa I. Mohammed2

1Department of Pharmacology Faculty of Medicine, Assiut University, Assiut, Egypt

2Department of Pharmacology Faculty of Medicine, Sohag University, Sohag, Egypt

3Department of Biochemistry Faculty of Medicine, Sohag University, Sohag, Egypt


Copyright © 2014 Mahmoud H. Abdel-Rahim et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

The effect of aminoguanidine, nicorandil and their combination against oxidative stress in streptozotocin (STZ) - induced diabetes mellitus was assessed in rats by determining changes in blood glucose level, superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), reduced glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA) and nitric oxide (NO) in healthy and experimentally induced diabetic rats. Besides, histhopathological examination of kidney and liver tissues was performed. Diabetic rats were randomized into groups of six rats and received 50mg/kg, intraperitoneally of aminoguanidine (an anti- advanced glycation end products (AGE) which prevents the formation of reactive oxygen species and lipid peroxidation in cells), 0.1mg/kg, orally of nicorandil (nicotinamide derivative which is efficacious in the treatment of hypertension and angina pectoris and a potassium channel opener) and their combination once daily for one month. Blood glucose level was significantly elevated in plasma of diabetic rats. SOD, CAT and GSH levels were significantly reduced, while MDA and NO levels were significantly elevated in plasma of diabetic rats. Abnormalities in both kidney and liver structures of diabetic rats were observed. Treatments of the diabetic rats with aminoguanidine, nicorandil and their combination led to improvement of the abnormalities in SOD, CAT, GSH, MDA, NO and also the histhopathological abnormalities of kidney and liver. From these results it can be concluded that aminoguanidine, nicorandil and their combination have the ability to attenuate oxidative stress induced by streptozotocin. This effect is positively correlated with their anti-oxidant activities.

Original Article
Egyptian Journal of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology
Vol. 4 (2014), Issue 1-2, pp. 49-60
doi:10.11131/2014/101347

Role of Aminoguanidine and Nicorandil in Oxidative Stress in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetes Mellitus in Rats

Mahmoud H. Abdel-Rahim1, Faten M. Omran2, Nagwa S. Ahmed3, and Walaa I. Mohammed2

1Department of Pharmacology Faculty of Medicine, Assiut University, Assiut, Egypt

2Department of Pharmacology Faculty of Medicine, Sohag University, Sohag, Egypt

3Department of Biochemistry Faculty of Medicine, Sohag University, Sohag, Egypt


Copyright © 2014 Mahmoud H. Abdel-Rahim et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

The effect of aminoguanidine, nicorandil and their combination against oxidative stress in streptozotocin (STZ) - induced diabetes mellitus was assessed in rats by determining changes in blood glucose level, superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), reduced glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA) and nitric oxide (NO) in healthy and experimentally induced diabetic rats. Besides, histhopathological examination of kidney and liver tissues was performed. Diabetic rats were randomized into groups of six rats and received 50mg/kg, intraperitoneally of aminoguanidine (an anti- advanced glycation end products (AGE) which prevents the formation of reactive oxygen species and lipid peroxidation in cells), 0.1mg/kg, orally of nicorandil (nicotinamide derivative which is efficacious in the treatment of hypertension and angina pectoris and a potassium channel opener) and their combination once daily for one month. Blood glucose level was significantly elevated in plasma of diabetic rats. SOD, CAT and GSH levels were significantly reduced, while MDA and NO levels were significantly elevated in plasma of diabetic rats. Abnormalities in both kidney and liver structures of diabetic rats were observed. Treatments of the diabetic rats with aminoguanidine, nicorandil and their combination led to improvement of the abnormalities in SOD, CAT, GSH, MDA, NO and also the histhopathological abnormalities of kidney and liver. From these results it can be concluded that aminoguanidine, nicorandil and their combination have the ability to attenuate oxidative stress induced by streptozotocin. This effect is positively correlated with their anti-oxidant activities.

Original Article
Egyptian Journal of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology
Vol. 4 (2014), Issue 1-2, pp. 49-60
doi:10.11131/2014/101347

Role of Aminoguanidine and Nicorandil in Oxidative Stress in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetes Mellitus in Rats

Mahmoud H. Abdel-Rahim1, Faten M. Omran2, Nagwa S. Ahmed3, and Walaa I. Mohammed2

1Department of Pharmacology Faculty of Medicine, Assiut University, Assiut, Egypt

2Department of Pharmacology Faculty of Medicine, Sohag University, Sohag, Egypt

3Department of Biochemistry Faculty of Medicine, Sohag University, Sohag, Egypt


Copyright © 2014 Mahmoud H. Abdel-Rahim et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

How to Cite this Article

Mahmoud H. Abdel-Rahim, Faten M. Omran, Nagwa S. Ahmed, and Walaa I. Mohammed, “Role of Aminoguanidine and Nicorandil in Oxidative Stress in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetes Mellitus in Rats,” Egyptian Journal of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology, Vol. 4, Issue 1-2, pp. 49-60, 2014. doi:10.11131/2014/101347